Getting Knowledge on State Domestic Violence Laws

Laws for domestic violence can be very restrictive or lenient in the state you reside, so a consultation with a family law attorney may be a wise choice. A majority of states have strict laws prohibiting such acts and have laws in place to protect women of domestic violence. The former couples involved in a domestic violence situation may be married, recently divorced, straight, gay, lesbian, living together, going out or not together anymore. Additional involvements may also exist and need to be talked over with a family law lawyer or law enforcement official.

Domestic violence may include verbal abuse, significant other from contacting family, friends, not sharing money, preventing a spouse from getting a job, making a spouse get fired from their job, physical abuse, threatening remarks, sexual assault, following, intimidation, etc. Any questions about what is considered domestic violence should be directed to an attorney or law enforcement official.

There are several hotlines and safe havens that exist for victims of domestic violence, so knowing this is available is very important. The National Domestic Violence National Phone line is among the resources victims should be privy to. The number is located in your local yellow pages. Browsing online is a great way to learn more about domestic abuse resources. Contact an experienced family law lawyer or law enforcement official for extensive information and resources.

An emergency protective order (EPO) may be obtained that according to local law strictly limits the accused from contacting or within a certain amount of feet near the victim. It may also grant custody of the kids (if applicable) to the victim or someone with whom they will be in a protective environment. When in immediate danger, victims should contact 911 instantly and tell the police officers what occurred once they arrive. The policeman may call an on-call court officer to give the EPO on the spot.

To be granted an EPO, the person in danger or his or her kids have to be in immediate and current life threatening situation of extreme violence. The order is valid for five court days or seven calendar days, whichever is less. Further information about an EPO can be obtained by talking to a family law laeyer or law enforcement officer.

To be approved for a temporary restraining order (TRO), the victim must file an application with the nearest family law court. If given, the TRO will be effective once the aggressor is served with papers. To find out more about TROs, victims should, once again, speak with an family law lawyer or a police officer or official deputy.

People affected by domestic violence can be of any gender, race, ethnic background, sexual orientation, age, etc. Knowing one’s resources and phoning the authorities if in immediate danger is important.